Prescription Drug Disposal

PDDBPlease see the ‘Prescription Drug Disposal Bin’ sticker. Here in Belvidere there is a safe drop off site for prescription drugs. This was set up in an effort to prevent drug abuse in Boone County.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse states that, “The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), which monitors emergency department (ED) visits in selected areas across the Nation, reported that approximately 1 million ED visits in 2009 could be attributed to prescription drug abuse. Roughly 343,000 involved prescription opioid pain relievers, a rate more than double that of 5 years prior. ED visits also more than doubled for CNS stimulants, involved in nearly 22,000 visits in 2009, as well as CNS depressants (anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics), involved in 363,000 visits. Of the latter, benzodiazepines (e.g., Xanax) comprised the vast majority. Rates for a popular prescribed nonbenzodiazepine sleep aid, zolpidem (Ambien), rose from roughly 13,000 in 2004 to 29,000 in 2009. More than half of ED visits for prescription drug abuse involved multiple drugs.”[1]

NIDA for teens, a site dediucated to educating teenagers about drug abuse and risky behavior says, “Can You Die If You Abuse Prescription Drugs?

Yes. More than half of the drug overdose deaths in the United States each year are caused by prescription drug abuse. In the last decade, the number of deaths from abuse of prescription drugs has increased dramatically.

In 2001, 9,197 people died from a prescription drug overdose; that number jumped to 22,810 in 2011. The trend holds true for young people—765 young people died as a result of a prescription drug overdose in 2001. In contrast, more than 2.5 times that—1,950 young people—died from an overdose in 2011. Close to 17,000 (74%) of all deaths from abuse of prescription drugs involved opioid painkillers and more than 6,800 (30%) involved a class of depressants known as benzodiazepines (some deaths include more than one type of drug).1

Mixing different types of prescription drugs can be particularly dangerous. For example, benzodiazepines interact with opioids and increase the risk of overdose.”[2]

 

[1] “How Many People Suffer Adverse Health Consequences from Abusing Prescription Drugs?” How Many People Suffer Adverse Health Consequences from Abusing Prescription Drugs? National Institute on Drug Abuse, n.d. Web. 17 Nov. 2015.

[2] “Prescription Drugs.” NIDA for Teens. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), n.d. Web. 17 Nov. 2015.

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